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Breaking School Habits

By Jason Leister

Live, don’t wait for permission.

In school, I was the annoying kid who knew the answer to everything. I would wait to be called on, but my hand would be up every chance I got hoping that would happen. 

I didn’t like being right. That you can do alone, in silence. I liked the teacher knowing I was right. I lived for the validation…like a true Matrix slave. Like I said. Annoying. 

I wasn’t aware that I was eventually going to be on the receiving end of a Universal joke when I got out into the world and realized I knew all the answers to the dumbest and most meaningless questions. Square root of 256? Simple. Quadratic equation? Of course! Solve a projectile motion problem in physics? Sure thing! 

But…“Can Jason tell us who he really is, and how he will grow a spine sufficient to allow him to do the work he came here to do…if he even has any idea what that work is?” Clueless!

We are taught a lot of terrible things in the Matrix indoctrination camps called school. Primarily, we are brainwashed into thinking we are consumers of reality instead of its creators. We’re supposed to know stuff instead of create stuff. 

Man-made religion doesn’t help either with its methods for getting humans to project their power into external, invisible beings who love to judge everyone. We are taught to take our divine inheritance and put it in a box where it will do no good. I wonder why? 

My kids have no concept of “waiting until you’re called on.” Their habit is to speak if they have something to say. Unfortunately, “waiting to be called on” transforms itself into the habit of “waiting to be granted permission” as you get older. 

There’s no teacher in the room any more, but it still feels like there is. Daddy is always watching. And he’ll get you if you step out of line. This is a habit that doesn’t seem to go away without some work. 

Unless you were one of the real intelligent people in school, the ones who refused to bend their will to that of the borg, the ones who were labeled things like “rebellious,” or “troubled” or “difficult” or, my personal favorite: “learning disabled…” (wonder why they never called it a teaching disability?), then there’s a chance the habit is still alive deep within. What can we do about it? 

We were trained to fear consequence. What if the reality is that the very consequences we fear are the stepping stones upon which we must travel to arrive at the expression of our true selves?

Well, I’m not much for using willpower. That seems to exist in limited supply within the human. Plus I suck at that. In my experience, the best way to stop a bad habit is to replace it with a new, good habit. So instead of waiting to be granted permission, we simply move forward based on our own intention for doing good in the world. When you practice that enough, it will become your new way of being. 

But won’t you get in trouble? We were trained to fear consequence. What if the reality is that the very consequences we fear are the stepping stones upon which we must travel to arrive at the expression of our true selves? That’s a question I wouldn’t have been able to answer in school.